Saturday, April 6, 2013

Vassily Primakov performs an All-Chopin piano recital at Carnegie's Zankel Hall

Russian pianist Vassily Primakov believes that his upcoming Chopin recital at Zankel Hall on April 19th represents “a turning point” in his life.
The date happens to have special significance for the artist, who feels he has arrived at a transitional moment in his career. “It was my mother’s birthday,” he says, “and I wanted to celebrate that for a long time with a concert, honoring her utmost love and guidance that lives on in my memories. She taught me so much, in life and music - the most important lesson perhaps was that music can never be faked and superficial. It has to come from the soul!”
Primakov’s solo recital will intimately reflect on Chopin’s oeuvre as the pianist discovered it throughout different stages in his life.“Chopin has always been my inspiration and my challenge; there is no other composer I would rather like to express with what I have learned, suffered, and experienced so far,” he explains, with a sense of personal urgency. For the first time, Primakov will present the Romantic Master’s Nocturnes, Ballades, Fantasie, Scherzo, Polonaise, Waltz, and Mazurkas. The repertoire makes up what he calls “my kind of program.” The Chopin pieces included on the recital are presented on Primakov’s recent album, which was released this March on the LP Classics label, which Primakov co-owns. The selections represent a “life-long journey” for Primakov.
Primakov will perform on a Yamaha CFX piano at Zankel Hall. “I fell in love with the Yamaha CFX, when Natalia Lavrova and I recorded Arensky’s two Piano Suites, in 2011. Since then, we both have been privileged to become Yamaha Artists and work with a great team that feels like family,” explains Primakov, whose recording is, very much in the vein of Chopin, dedicated to “the one and only Natalia Lavrova,” his longtime friend, duo partner, and business partner in LP Classics.
Russian pianist Vassily Primakov believes that his upcoming Chopin recital at Zaenkel Hall on April 19th represents “a turning point” in his life.
The date happens to have special significance for the artist, who feels he has arrived at a transitional moment in his career. “It was my mother’s birthday,” he says, “and I wanted to celebrate that for a long time with a concert, honoring her utmost love and guidance that lives on in my memories. She taught me so much, in life and music - the most important lesson perhaps was that music can never be faked and superficial. It has to come from the soul!”
Primakov’s solo recital will reflect on Chopin’s oeuvre as it was informed by intimate discovery, experienced throughout different stages during his life. “Chopin has always been my inspiration and my challenge; there is no other composer I would rather like to express with what I have learned, suffered, and experienced so far,” he explains, with a sense of personal urgency. For the first time, Primakov will present the Romantic Master’s Nocturnes, Ballades, Fantasie, Scherzo, Polonaise, Waltz, and Mazurkas. The repertoire makes up what he calls “my kind of program.” The Chopin pieces included on the recital are presented on Primakov’s recent album, which was released this March on the LP Classics label, which Primakov co-owns. The selections represent a “life-long journey” for Primakov.
Primakov will perform on a Yamaha CFX piano at Zankel Hall. “I fell in love with the Yamaha CFX, when Natalia Lavrova and I recorded Arensky’s two Piano Suites, in 2011. Since then, we both have been privileged to become Yamaha Artists and work with a great team that feels like family,” explains Primakov, whose recording is, very much in the vein of Chopin, dedicated to “the one and only Natalia Lavrova,” his longtime friend, duo partner, and business partner in LP Classics.
Gramophone notes that, “Primakov’s empathy with Chopin’s spirit could hardly be more complete,” and American Record Guide praises him as a “great Chopin pianist.” The upcoming recital promises to allow Primakov to take his audience along on his journey, as they enjoy the sensitive and expressive Chopin-esque quality of his sound.

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